Reliance Tennessee

 

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In the late 19th Century, the arrival of the railroad and river ferry and the location of nearby logging camps helped Reliance develop into a small commercial and social center for the surrounding area. By the early 20th Century, a bridge replaced the ferry as the main form of transportation across the river.

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Vaughn-Webb house

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The Vaughn-Webb house was built in the late 1880’s. In addition to operating a grist mill, the Vaughn family grew corn and hay, raised cattle, hogs, and mules, and cut timber.

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Higdon Hotel

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The Higdon Hotel was built by Calvin Higdon on the north side of the river after the L&N Railroad purchased right-of-way for track construction in 1888. The large two-story frame hotel with a two-story front porch provided accommodations for the railroad personnel and travelers.With the increasing use of automobiles, fewer passenger trains stopped in Reliance and the hotel ceased to operate around 1920.

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Watchman’s House

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The Watchman’s House was built in 1891 for use by the railroad watchman, who checked the railroad bridge for burning embers after the train passed over.

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Hiwassee Union Church and Masonic Lodge

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The Hiwassee Union Church and Masonic Lodge joined forces around 1899 to build a two-story frame building with a full porch across the front. The upper floor was used by the Masons, with the church meeting on the first floor. During the week, the church was used as a school for a short time.

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Webb Brothers’ Store

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Webb Brothers’ Store opened on May 15, 1936 to serve as general store, post office, gas station and library. Still in existence, it is now housed in a 1955 building and is still operating as a general store. In 1969, a whitewater rafting service was begun by the Webb family, bringing a new era of activity to the community, which still retains its historic character.

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